JTM - a former OSI standard

"Job Transfer and Manipulation" was on ISO standard from 1989 to 1997 which suffered from a misunderstanding of what it could do. It included a number of ideas that have possilbe relevance to current developments in various areas, such as workflow, messaging/queueing and e-commerce applications. Since the standard is now withdrawn, it has been possible to make the text available here. There are two documents:
  • ISO 8831 - JTM concepts and service
  • ISO 8832 - JTM protocol

  • Note that these documents have been withdrawn as ISO/IEC standards and can therefore only be used under the sole responsibility of the user(s): consequently ISO will always decline any responsibility and liability.

    Like most standards, JTM is fairly indigestible - the section on "What was JTM technically" below gives a quick outline. Within the standards, there is a tutorial annex which might be a good place to start - or you may prefer the overview in the service definition. The supermarket scenario also gives an idea of what might be done, though it uses rather too much JTM jargon

    Brief history of the standard

    What was JTM technically

    JTM as web pages and a warning on the status of the documents

    The HTML files on this website have been constructed from the original text kept by the editor. Since this was in SGML, the conversion to HTML was fairly easy and used some Perl scripts. It is possible these have mangled the text unintentionally, but what you see should be the text as published, including a couple of corrigenda. There are some mistakes in the ASN.1, which exceeded the capabilities of most (all ?) of the ASN.1 tools available when it was written. (See brief description of webbifying JTM if you want to know more on the conversion to HTML).

    While JTM was an International Standard, there were restrictions on the availability of the text. Since it is now withdrawn, it has been possible to make a version of the text freely available on the web. The official ISO position was given by Jacques-Olivier Chabot in an email (dated 27 April 1998):

    From our point of view, an ISO standard, whether valid, cancelled or cancelled and replaced by another standard or a revised edtion, remains under the ISO copyright. The ISO copyright also protects DISs, FDISs or CDs, although they are not yet valid documents.

    Nevertheless we have no objection if you put the text of these two withdrawn standards on your web page: Our one condition is that you make it clear, in a warning notice appearing immediately when you open the files, that these two standards are withdrawn and can therefore only be used under the sole responsibility of the user(s): consequently ISO will always decline any responsibility and liability.

    What now

    JTM never really had a past, and it certainly isn't worth trying to revive it as it was. Several of the features, as listed above, have been reused/reinvented (or needed but not included) in more recent specifications. I would be interested to hear from anyone who finds it useful or would like to discuss this protocol-that-never-was.


    Peter Furniss
    peter@furniss.co.uk
    8 February 2000